Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2018 Feb;136:32-38. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2017.11.032. Epub 2017 Dec 1.

Type 2 diabetes mellitus management among Ghanaian migrants resident in three European countries and their compatriots in rural and urban Ghana - The RODAM study.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Center - University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Center - University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: k.a.meeks@amc.uva.nl.
3
Department of Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom.
4
Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany.
5
Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany; Institute for Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Luisenstr. 57, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
6
Regional Institute for Population Studies, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 96, Legon, Ghana.
7
Julius Global Health, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, The Netherlands; Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
8
Kumasi Centre for Collaborative Research, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana.
9
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany; German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Oudenarder Straße 16, 13316 Berlin, Germany; Center for Cardiovascular Research (CCR), Charité-University Medicine Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Hessische Str. 3-4, 10115 Berlin, Germany.
10
Institute of Tropical Medicine and International Health, Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany.
11
MKPGMS-Uganda Martyrs University, Kampala, Uganda.

Abstract

AIMS:

To compare Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) awareness, treatment and control between Ghanaians resident in Ghana and Europe.

METHODS:

Comparisons were made for the 530 participants of the Research on Obesity and Diabetes among African Migrants (RODAM) study with T2DM (25-70 years) living in Amsterdam, Berlin, London, urban Ghana and rural Ghana. We used logistic regression to assess disparities with adjustment for age, sex and education.

RESULTS:

T2DM awareness was 51% in rural Ghana. This was lower than levels in Europe ranging from 73% in London (age-sex adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.7; 95%CI = 1.2-6.0) to 79% in Amsterdam (OR = 4.7; 95%CI = 2.3-9.6). T2DM treatment was also lower in rural Ghana (37%) than in urban Ghana (56%; OR = 2.6; 95%CI = 1.3-5.3) and European sites ranging from 67% in London (OR = 3.4; 95%CI = 1.5-7.5) to 73% in Berlin (OR = 6.9; 95%CI = 2.9-16.4). In contrast, T2DM control in rural Ghana (63%) was comparable to Amsterdam and Berlin, but higher than in London (40%; OR = 0.4; 95%CI = 0.2-0.9) and urban Ghana (28%; OR = 0.3; 95%CI = 0.1-0.6).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that improved detection and treatment of T2DM in rural Ghana, and improved control for people with diagnosed T2DM in London and urban Ghana warrant prioritization. Further work is needed to understand the factors driving the differences.

KEYWORDS:

Ethnic minority groups; Ghana; Migrants; RODAM study; Sub-Saharan Africans; Type 2 diabetes mellitus

PMID:
29203253
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2017.11.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
Loading ...
Support Center