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Eat Behav. 2018 Jan;28:8-15. doi: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2017.11.005. Epub 2017 Nov 17.

Sweet taste preference in binge-eating disorder: A preliminary investigation.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States; Department of Psychology, University of North Dakota, United States.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States; Department of Psychology, George Mason University, United States; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States; School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Australia; School of Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States; Department of Neurosurgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States.
6
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States.
7
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, United States. Electronic address: kim_brownley@med.unc.edu.

Abstract

Research suggests that individuals with high liking for sweets are at increased risk for binge eating, which has been minimally investigated in individuals with binge-eating disorder (BED). Forty-one adults (85% female, 83% white) with binge eating concerns completed a sweet taste test and measures of eating disorder behaviors and food cravings. A subset of participants with BED completed an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; N=21) and a 24-hour dietary recall (N=26). Regression models were used to compare highest sweet preferers (HSP [N=18]) to other sweet preferers (OSP [N=23]) and were used to assess associations between sweet taste preference and outcome variables. Effect sizes (ηp2) for differences between HSP and OSP ranged from small (≤0.01) to large (≥0.24); group differences were statistically nonsignificant except for 24-hour caloric intake (ηp2=0.16, p=0.04), protein intake (ηp2=0.16, p=0.04), and insulin sensitivity index (ηp2=0.24, p=0.04), which were higher in HSP, and postprandial insulin, which was smaller in HSP (ηp2=0.27, p=0.03). Continuous analyses replicated postprandial insulin response. Compared with OSP, HSP reported numerically higher binge-eating frequency (ηp2=0.04), over-eating frequency (ηp2=0.06), and carbohydrate intake (ηp2=0.14), and they exhibited numerically smaller postprandial glucose AUC (ηp2=0.16). Sweet taste preference may have implications for glucose regulation, binge-eating frequency, and nutrient intake in BED.

KEYWORDS:

Binge-eating disorder; Blood glucose levels; Food craving; Insulin; Sweet taste

PMID:
29202335
DOI:
10.1016/j.eatbeh.2017.11.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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