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Ann Rehabil Med. 2017 Oct;41(5):776-785. doi: 10.5535/arm.2017.41.5.776. Epub 2017 Oct 31.

Quantitative Analysis of Swallowing Function Between Dysphagia Patients and Healthy Subjects Using High-Resolution Manometry.

Author information

1
Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
3
Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Eulji University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
4
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

Objective:

To compare swallowing function between healthy subjects and patients with pharyngeal dysphagia using high resolution manometry (HRM) and to evaluate the usefulness of HRM for detecting pharyngeal dysphagia.

Methods:

Seventy-five patients with dysphagia and 28 healthy subjects were included in this study. Diagnosis of dysphagia was confirmed by a videofluoroscopy. HRM was performed to measure pressure and timing information at the velopharynx (VP), tongue base (TB), and upper esophageal sphincter (UES). HRM parameters were compared between dysphagia and healthy groups. Optimal threshold values of significant HRM parameters for dysphagia were determined.

Results:

VP maximal pressure, TB maximal pressure, UES relaxation duration, and UES resting pressure were lower in the dysphagia group than those in healthy group. UES minimal pressure was higher in dysphagia group than in the healthy group. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were conducted to validate optimal threshold values for significant HRM parameters to identify patients with pharyngeal dysphagia. With maximal VP pressure at a threshold value of 144.0 mmHg, dysphagia was identified with 96.4% sensitivity and 74.7% specificity. With maximal TB pressure at a threshold value of 158.0 mmHg, dysphagia was identified with 96.4% sensitivity and 77.3% specificity. At a threshold value of 2.0 mmHg for UES minimal pressure, dysphagia was diagnosed at 74.7% sensitivity and 60.7% specificity. Lastly, UES relaxation duration of <0.58 seconds had 85.7% sensitivity and 65.3% specificity, and UES resting pressure of <75.0 mmHg had 89.3% sensitivity and 90.7% specificity for identifying dysphagia.

Conclusion:

We present evidence that HRM could be a useful evaluation tool for detecting pharyngeal dysphagia.

KEYWORDS:

Deglutition disorders; Manometry; Pharynx; Upper esophageal sphincter

Conflict of interest statement

CONFLICT OF INTEREST: No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

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