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Med Sci (Paris). 2017 Nov;33(11):955-962. doi: 10.1051/medsci/20173311012. Epub 2017 Dec 4.

[Skeletal muscle aging and mitochondrial dysfunction: an update].

[Article in French]

Author information

1
Département des sciences de l'activité physique, faculté des sciences, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), 141, avenue du Président Kennedy, H2X 1Y4 Montréal, Canada - Groupe de recherche en activité physique adaptée, Montréal, Canada.
2
Département des sciences de l'activité physique, faculté des sciences, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), 141, avenue du Président Kennedy, H2X 1Y4 Montréal, Canada - Groupe de recherche en activité physique adaptée, Montréal, Canada - McGill University, Montréal, Canada.
3
Département des sciences de l'activité physique, faculté des sciences, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), 141, avenue du Président Kennedy, H2X 1Y4 Montréal, Canada - Groupe de recherche en activité physique adaptée, Montréal, Canada - Centre de recherche de l'institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, Canada.

Abstract

One of the most obvious and deleterious changes occurring with aging is a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, a physiological process named sarcopenia. Amongst the multiple theories that have been put forward to explain sarcopenia, the mitochondrial theory of aging, which postulates that the accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunctions with aging plays a causal role in muscle atrophy, has focused intense research effort and attention in the past decades. The generally accepted view of this theory is that, due to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production inherent to respiratory chain activity, oxidative damage to mitochondrial proteins, lipids and DNA accumulates with aging. This damage is thought to (i) exacerbate mitochondrial ROS production, (ii) impair the capacity of mitochondria to adequately match the cellular ATP demand and (iii) trigger mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Although very appealing, this theory remains controversial. The aims of the present review are (i) to provide the reader with a short, but comprehensive review of the current literature linking mitochondrial dysfunction and sarcopenia and (ii) to briefly discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction with muscle aging.

PMID:
29200393
DOI:
10.1051/medsci/20173311012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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