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Prev Med. 2018 Jun;111:384-390. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.11.031. Epub 2017 Dec 1.

Sitting patterns after relocation to activity-based offices: A controlled study of a natural intervention.

Author information

1
Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden. Electronic address: david.hallman@hig.se.
2
Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.

Abstract

This study determined the effect of relocating workers from traditional to activity-based offices on objectively measured sitting patterns. Office workers (n=493) from five office-sites within a large Swedish government agency were included in a controlled study of a natural intervention (2015-2017). At four sites, traditional offices were replaced by activity-based offices, while workers at one site with no relocation acted as controls. Sitting, standing and walking were measured objectively for 5-8days in a sub-sample (n=110) using accelerometry (Actigraph). Total sitting time (% of working time) and time spent in short (<5min), moderate (5-30min) and prolonged (>30min) uninterrupted periods in sitting were determined. Intervention effects were determined at 3- and 12-month follow-ups using linear mixed models adjusted for baseline age, gender and office type, and stratified by office-site (referencing controls). The relocation to activity-based offices did not result in an overall effect (across sites) on occupational sitting time (all p>0.05), while walking time had increased significantly by 1.4% of the working time at 12months compared with controls. Heterogeneous results were found across offices after 12months on total sitting time compared with controls (estimated change -18.3% time-1.4% time), prolonged sitting (change -18.3% to -3.8%), walking (change 0.5%-3.5%) and standing (change -1.4%-13.9%). In conclusion, relocation to activity-based offices had a limited overall effect on occupational sitting patterns in the studied organization, but differed considerably between office sites. Site-specific determinants of sitting behavior in activity-based offices need be identified.

KEYWORDS:

Accelerometer; Flexible office; Longitudinal study; Physical activity; Sedentary

PMID:
29199119
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.11.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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