Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2018 Jan - Feb;65:34-41. doi: 10.1016/j.ntt.2017.11.004. Epub 2017 Dec 1.

Prenatal phthalate exposure and language development in toddlers from the Odense Child Cohort.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
2
TrygFonden's Center for Child Research and School of Communication and Culture, Aarhus, Denmark.
3
Department of Environmental Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States.
4
Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; International Center for Research and Research Training in Endocrine Disruption of Male Reproduction and Child Health (EDMaRC), Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
5
Department of Language and Communication, Faculty of Humanities, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
6
Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Odense, Mental Health Services in the Region of Southern Denmark, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; Department of Clinical Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
7
Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Kløvervænget 23 C, 5000 Odense C, Denmark; Odense Patient data Explorative Network (OPEN), Odense, Denmark.
8
Department of Environmental Medicine, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; Hans Christian Andersen Children's Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Kløvervænget 23 C, 5000 Odense C, Denmark; Odense Patient data Explorative Network (OPEN), Odense, Denmark. Electronic address: tkjensen@health.sdu.dk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Phthalates are a group of chemicals found in a variety of consumer products. They have anti-androgenic properties and human studies have reported associations between prenatal phthalate exposure and neuropsychological development in the offspring despite different cognitive tests, different ages and varying timing of exposure.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the association between prenatal phthalate exposure and language development in children aged 20-36months.

METHODS:

In the Odense Child Cohort, we analyzed 3rd trimester urine samples of 518 pregnant women for content of metabolites of diethyl, di-n-butyl, diisobutyl, butylbenzyl, di(2-ethylhexyl), and diisononyl phthalate, adjusted for osmolality. Language development was addressed using the Danish version of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories "Words and Sentences". Associations were assessed using logistic regression models comparing children below and above the 15th percentile while stratifying by sex and adjusting for maternal age and educational level.

RESULTS:

Phthalate metabolites were detectable in all samples although in lower levels than previous studies. Among boys, increased prenatal phthalate exposure was associated with lower scores in language development; odds ratios for vocabulary score below the 15th percentile with doubling in monoethyl phthalate, and summed di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate metabolites were respectively 1.24 (95% confidence interval: 1.05,1.46), and 1.33 (1.01,1.75). Similar associations were found for language complexity. No associations were found for girls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings are notable, as adverse associations were suggested even in this low-level exposed population, with only one spot urine sample for exposure assessment and control for confounders. Lower scores in early language development are of relevance to health as this test predicts later educational success.

PMID:
29198963
DOI:
10.1016/j.ntt.2017.11.004

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center