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J Infect. 2018 Feb;76(2):186-195. doi: 10.1016/j.jinf.2017.11.008. Epub 2017 Dec 14.

Anti-apolipoprotein A-1 autoantibodies are associated with immunodeficiency and systemic inflammation in HIV patients.

Author information

1
Division of Laboratory Medicine, Department of Genetics and Laboratory Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, 4 rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland; Clinical Chemistry and Proteomic Group, Department of Human Protein Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: nathalie.satta@unige.ch.
2
Division of Laboratory Medicine, Department of Genetics and Laboratory Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, 4 rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland; Clinical Chemistry and Proteomic Group, Department of Human Protein Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
3
First Medical Clinic, Laboratory of Phagocyte Physiopathology and Inflammation, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, 6 viale Benedetto XV 16132 Genoa, Italy; IRCCS AOU San Martino - IST, Genova, largo Benzi 10 16143 Genoa, Italy; Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research (CEBR), University of Genoa, 9 viale Benedetto XV, 16132 Genoa, Italy.
4
Division of Cardiology, Foundation for Medical Researches, Department of Medical Specialties, University of Geneva, 64 Avenue de la Roseraie, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland.
5
Division of Infectious Diseases and of Laboratory Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
6
Chairman of the Clinical and Laboratory Committee.
7
President of the SHCS.
8
Deputy of "Positive Council".
9
Chairman of the Scientific Board.
10
Head of Data Center.
11
Chairman of the Mother & Child Substudy.
12
Members.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the existence of autoantibodies against apolipoprotein A-1 (anti-apoA-1 IgG) in HIV patients and explore their association with biological features of HIV infection and different inflammatory biomarkers. We also evaluated their impact on CD4+ lymphocytes survival.

METHODS:

Anti-apoA-1 IgG plasma levels were assessed by ELISA in 237 HIV positive patients from a national prospective cohort with no current lipid-lowering therapy.

RESULTS:

58% of patients were found positive for anti-apoA-1 IgG and were associated with lower CD4+ counts, but higher viremia and systemic inflammation. Logistic regression analyses indicated that high anti-apoA-1 IgG levels were associated with a 16-fold increased risk of displaying low CD4+ levels, independent of HIV RNA levels and treatment (adjusted Odds ratio [OR]:16.1, 95% Confidence Interval [95%CI]:1.80-143.6; p = 0.01), and a 6-fold increased risk of having a detectable viremia, independent of antiretroviral treatment (OR:5.47; 95% CI:1.63-18.36; p = 0.006). In vitro, anti-apoA-1 IgG induced dose and time-dependent CD4+ apoptosis that was increased by exposure to HIV RNA.

CONCLUSIONS:

In HIV patients, anti-apoA-1 IgG levels are associated with low CD4+ counts, high viremia and a pro-inflammatory systemic profile. Anti-apoA-1 IgG can promote CD4+ lymphocyte apoptosis via undefined pathways.

KEYWORDS:

Anti-apoA-1 IgG; Apoptosis; Autoantibodies; HIV; Inflammation

PMID:
29198606
DOI:
10.1016/j.jinf.2017.11.008

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