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Trends Cancer. 2017 Dec;3(12):812-815. doi: 10.1016/j.trecan.2017.10.001. Epub 2017 Nov 6.

Spinal Cord Injuries and Nerve Dependence in Prostate Cancer.

Author information

1
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia; Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, New Lambton, NSW 2305, Australia; Department of Surgery, John Hunter Hospital, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia.
2
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia; Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, New Lambton, NSW 2305, Australia.
3
Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, New Lambton, NSW 2305, Australia; School of Public Health and Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia.
4
School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia; Hunter Medical Research Institute, University of Newcastle, New Lambton, NSW 2305, Australia. Electronic address: hubert.hondermarck@newcastle.edu.au.

Abstract

Nerves are emerging as drivers of tumorigenesis, as demonstrated in the mouse where denervation suppresses prostate cancer; however, clinical evidence is needed. Patients with spinal cord injuries (SCIs) resulting in functional denervation of the prostate have a lower incidence of prostate cancer. This may constitute a clinical evidence for nerve dependence in human prostate tumorigenesis.

KEYWORDS:

cancer; nerve dependence; nerves; prostate; spinal cord injuries

PMID:
29198437
DOI:
10.1016/j.trecan.2017.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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