Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Neurophysiol. 2018 Jan;129(1):210-221. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2017.10.024. Epub 2017 Nov 6.

Abnormal cortical neural synchrony during working memory in schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA. Electronic address: kangseung@umkc.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA; Department of Neuroscience, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.
3
Department of Neuroscience, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA; Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Minneapolis, MN 55417, USA.
4
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, South Korea.
5
Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Colledge Park, MD 20742, USA.
6
Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Minneapolis, MN 55417, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.
7
Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Minneapolis, MN 55417, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA; Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55454, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To better understand the origins of working memory (WM) impairment in schizophrenia we investigated cortical oscillatory activity in people with schizophrenia (PSZ) while they performed a WM task requiring encoding, maintenance, and retrieval/manipulation processes of spatial information.

METHODS:

We examined time-frequency synchronous energy of cortical source signals that were derived from magnetoencephalography (MEG) localized to cortical regions using WM-related hemodynamic responses and individualized structural head-models.

RESULTS:

Compared to thirteen healthy controls (HC), twelve PSZ showed performance deficits regardless of WM-load or duration. During encoding, PSZ had early theta and delta event-related synchrony (ERS) deficits in prefrontal and visual cortices which worsened with greater memory load and predicted WM performance. During prolonged maintenance of material, PSZ showed deficient beta event-related desynchrony (ERD) in dorsolateral prefrontal, posterior parietal, and visual cortices. In retrieval, PSZ showed reduced delta/theta ERS in the anterior prefrontal and ventral visual cortices and diminished gamma ERS in the premotor and posterior parietal cortices.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although beta/gamma cortical neural oscillatory deficits for maintenance/retrieval are evident during WM, the abnormal prefrontal theta-frequency ERS for encoding is most predictive of poor WM in schizophrenia.

SIGNIFICANCE:

Time-frequency-spatial analysis identified process- and frequency-specific neural synchrony abnormalities underlying WM deficits in schizophrenia.

KEYWORDS:

Cortical source analysis; Magnetoencephalography (MEG); Neural oscillation; Schizophrenia; Working memory

PMID:
29197736
PMCID:
PMC5745038
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2017.10.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center