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Crit Care Nurse. 2017 Dec;37(6):e10-e16. doi: 10.4037/ccn2017961.

Identifying Information Resources for Patients in the Intensive Care Unit and Their Families.

Schnock KO1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, Ravindran SS1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, Fladger A1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, Leone K1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, Williams DM1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, Dwyer CL1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, Vu TG1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, Thornton K1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, Gazarian P10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18.

Author information

1
Kumiko O. Schnock is a research associate, Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
2
Sucheta S. Ravindran is a medical student at Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois.
3
Anne Fladger is a director, Medical Library at Brigham and Women's Hospital.
4
Kathleen Leone is an adjunct faculty at Simmons College, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Donna M. Williams is a nurse specialist cardiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
6
Cynthia L. Dwyer is a clinical quality and innovation coach at the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland.
7
Thanh-Giang Vu is a resident physician, Department of Anesthesia, University of California, San Francisco, California.
8
Kevin Thornton is associate clinical professor in the Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco.
9
Priscilla Gazarian is the nursing program director and a nurse scientist at Brigham and Women's Hospital and an associate professor of nursing at School of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts.
10
Kumiko O. Schnock is a research associate, Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. priscilla.gazarian@gmail.com.
11
Sucheta S. Ravindran is a medical student at Rush Medical College, Chicago, Illinois. priscilla.gazarian@gmail.com.
12
Anne Fladger is a director, Medical Library at Brigham and Women's Hospital. priscilla.gazarian@gmail.com.
13
Kathleen Leone is an adjunct faculty at Simmons College, Boston, Massachusetts. priscilla.gazarian@gmail.com.
14
Donna M. Williams is a nurse specialist cardiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. priscilla.gazarian@gmail.com.
15
Cynthia L. Dwyer is a clinical quality and innovation coach at the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. priscilla.gazarian@gmail.com.
16
Thanh-Giang Vu is a resident physician, Department of Anesthesia, University of California, San Francisco, California. priscilla.gazarian@gmail.com.
17
Kevin Thornton is associate clinical professor in the Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco. priscilla.gazarian@gmail.com.
18
Priscilla Gazarian is the nursing program director and a nurse scientist at Brigham and Women's Hospital and an associate professor of nursing at School of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts. priscilla.gazarian@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Providing information to patients in intensive care units and their families is challenging. Patients often are admitted unexpectedly and experience stress and uncertainty. One source of stress has been identified as unclear, uncoordinated, or inconsistent communication and information. Despite the need for information, no centrally located, easily accessible, standardized intensive care unit education content exists.

OBJECTIVE:

To identify educational content for patients in the intensive care unit and their families across 4 different hospitals, develop a general content database, and organize the general content into a framework for education of patients and their families.

METHODS:

Educational content for patients in the intensive care units of 4 participating hospitals was collected and a gap analysis was performed.

RESULTS:

Key content format and categories were identified. Educational content was organized into an information pathway divided into 3 phases: intensive care unit arrival; understanding the intensive care unit and partnering in care; and intensive care unit transitions. The gap analysis revealed substantial variation in content format and categories.

CONCLUSIONS:

Structuring a digital learning center using different stages of the patient's stay in the intensive care unit and placing resources in the context of an information pathway can help coordinate education for these patients and their families, and creates a consistent communication guide for clinicians as well. The optimal digital format should be considered in designing the learning center.

PMID:
29196595
DOI:
10.4037/ccn2017961
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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