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J Acoust Soc Am. 2017 Nov;142(5):EL512. doi: 10.1121/1.5011673.

Last call: Passive acoustic monitoring shows continued rapid decline of critically endangered vaquita.

Author information

1
Centre for Research into Ecological and Environmental Modelling, University of St Andrews, The Observatory, Buchanan Gardens, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 9LZ, United Kingdom len.thomas@st-andrews.ac.uk.
2
Instituto Nacional de Ecologia y Cambio Climatico/SEMARNAT, Coordinacion de Investigacion y Conservacion de Mamiferos Marinos, CICESE Camper 10, Carretera Ensenada-Tijuana 3918, Zona Playitas, Ensenada, Baja California 22860, Mexico ajaramil@cicese.mx, gcardenas03@gmail.com, edwynanieto@gmail.com, lrojasbracho@gmail.com.
3
Alaska Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries, Marine Mammal Laboratory, Seattle, Washington 98115, USA jay.verhoef@noaa.gov.
4
NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Marine Mammal and Turtle Division, 8901 La Jolla Shores Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA jeff.e.moore@noaa.gov, barbara.taylor@noaa.gov, jay.barlow@noaa.gov.
5
Chelonia Limited, The Barkhouse, Mousehole, TR196PH, United Kingdom nick.tregenza@chelonia.co.uk.

Abstract

The vaquita is a critically endangered species of porpoise. It produces echolocation clicks, making it a good candidate for passive acoustic monitoring. A systematic grid of sensors has been deployed for 3 months annually since 2011; results from 2016 are reported here. Statistical models (to compensate for non-uniform data loss) show an overall decline in the acoustic detection rate between 2015 and 2016 of 49% (95% credible interval 82% decline to 8% increase), and total decline between 2011 and 2016 of over 90%. Assuming the acoustic detection rate is proportional to population size, approximately 30 vaquita (95% credible interval 8-96) remained in November 2016.

PMID:
29195434
DOI:
10.1121/1.5011673
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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