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Acta Paediatr. 2018 Jul;107(7):1122-1130. doi: 10.1111/apa.14170. Epub 2018 Jan 4.

Exposure to human voices has beneficial effects on preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit.

Author information

1
Laboratoire Ethologie, Cognition, Développement, Univiversité Paris Nanterre, Nanterre, France.
2
Università della Valle d'Aosta, Italy.
3
Université de Genève, Suisse.
4
Médecine et Réanimation du nouveau-né, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Strasbourg, France.
5
Institut de Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, France.

Abstract

We reviewed the literature up to March 2016 on the effects of nonmaternal voices on preterm infants' clinical outcomes. Of the 11 studies that met the inclusion criteria, 10 focused on short-term outcomes and one looked at long-term effects. The studies mainly showed that vocal stimuli increased preterm infants' stability in terms of heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and behavioural measures. Improvements in feeding skills were also reported. The methods and the measures used in the studies were heterogeneous, making it difficult to draw reliable conclusions.

CONCLUSION:

Vocal stimuli increased preterm infants' stability, but further studies are needed.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical outcomes; Literature review; Neonatal intensive care; Preterm infant; Vocal stimuli

PMID:
29193301
DOI:
10.1111/apa.14170

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