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BMC Complement Altern Med. 2017 Dec 1;17(1):512. doi: 10.1186/s12906-017-2024-5.

Pediatric training and practice of Canadian chiropractic and naturopathic doctors: a 2004-2014 comparative study.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, CARE Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
2
Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, Toronto, Canada.
3
Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Toronto, Canada.
4
Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine, New Westminster, Canada.
5
Département de Chiropratique, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, Canada.
6
Department of Pediatrics, CARE Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. svohra@ualberta.ca.
7
Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. svohra@ualberta.ca.
8
Department of Pediatrics, CARE Program, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Suite #1702, College Plaza, 8215 112 St NW, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2C8, Canada. svohra@ualberta.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To assess chiropractic (DC) and naturopathic doctors' (ND) knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour with respect to the pediatric patients in their practice.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional surveys were developed in collaboration with DC and ND educators. Surveys were sent to randomly selected DCs and NDs in Ontario, Canada in 2004, and a national online survey was conducted in 2014. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, non-parametric tests, and linear regression.

RESULTS:

Response rates for DCs were n = 172 (34%) in 2004, n = 553 (15.5%) in 2014, and for NDs, n = 171 (36%) in 2004, n = 162 (7%) in 2014. In 2014, 366 (78.4%) of DCs and 83 (61%) of NDs saw one or more pediatric patients per week. Pediatric training was rated as inadequate by most respondents in both 2004 and 2014, with most respondents (n = 643, 89.9%) seeking post-graduate training by 2014. Respondents' comfort in treating children and youth is based on experience and post-graduate training. Both DCs and NDs that see children and youth in their practices address a broad array of pediatric health concerns, from well child care and preventative health, to mild and serious illness.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although the response rate in 2014 is low, the concerns identified a decade earlier remain. The majority of responding DCs and NDs see infants, children, and youth for a variety of health conditions and issues, but self-assess their undergraduate pediatric training as inadequate. We encourage augmented pediatric educational content be included as core curriculum for DCs and NDs and suggest collaboration with institutions/organizations with expertise in pediatric education to facilitate curriculum development, especially in areas that affect patient safety.

KEYWORDS:

Chiropractic; Complementary medicine; Integrative medicine; Naturopathic; Pediatrics; Survey

PMID:
29191235
PMCID:
PMC5710071
DOI:
10.1186/s12906-017-2024-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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