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J Infect Dis. 2018 Jan 30;217(4):628-636. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jix604.

Protection of the Human Gut Microbiome From Antibiotics.

Author information

1
Da Volterra, Paris, France.
2
Metagenopolis, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Jouy-en-Josas, France.
3
Bichat Claude Bernard Hospital, University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris.
4
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Infection Antimicrobials Modelling Evolution, Unité Mixte de Recherche, France.
5
University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris.
6
Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif, France.

Abstract

Background:

Antibiotics are life-saving drugs but severely affect the gut microbiome with short-term consequences including diarrhea and selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Long-term links to allergy and obesity are also suggested. We devised a product, DAV132, and previously showed its ability to deliver a powerful adsorbent, activated charcoal, in the late ileum of human volunteers.

Methods:

We performed a randomized controlled trial in 28 human volunteers treated with a 5-day clinical regimen of the fluoroquinolone antibiotic moxifloxacin in 2 parallel groups, with or without DAV132 coadministration. Two control goups of 8 volunteers each receiving DAV132 alone, or a nonactive substitute, were added.

Results:

The coadministration of DAV132 decreased free moxifloxacin fecal concentrations by 99%, while plasmatic levels were unaffected. Shotgun quantitative metagenomics showed that the richness and composition of the intestinal microbiota were largely preserved in subjects co-treated with DAV132 in addition to moxifloxacin. No adverse effect was observed. In addition, DAV132 efficiently adsorbed a wide range of clinically relevant antibiotics ex vivo.

Conclusions:

DAV132 was highly effective to protect the gut microbiome of moxifloxacin-treated healthy volunteers and may constitute a clinical breakthrough by preventing adverse health consequences of a wide range of antibiotic treatments.

Clinical Trials Registration:

NCT02176005.

KEYWORDS:

Clostridium difficile; antibiotics; fluoroquinolones; microbiome

PMID:
29186529
PMCID:
PMC5853327
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jix604
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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