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Vaccine. 2018 Jan 2;36(1):29-35. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.11.040. Epub 2017 Nov 26.

Meningococcal carriage among a university student population - United States, 2015.

Author information

1
Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch, Division of Bacterial Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329, United States; Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329, United States.
2
Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch, Division of Bacterial Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329, United States.
3
University Health Services, Brown University, 13 Brown Street, Providence, RI 02906, United States.
4
Rhode Island Department of Health, 3 Capitol Hill, Providence, RI 02908, United States.
5
Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch, Division of Bacterial Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329, United States. Electronic address: smeyer@cdc.gov.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Several outbreaks of serogroup B meningococcal disease have occurred among university students in recent years. In the setting of high coverage of the quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine and prior to widespread use of serogroup B meningococcal vaccines among adolescents, we conducted surveys to characterize the prevalence and molecular characteristics of meningococcal carriage among university students.

METHODS:

Two cross-sectional oropharyngeal carriage surveys were conducted among undergraduates at a Rhode Island university. Isolates were characterized using slide agglutination, real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR), and whole genome sequencing. Adjusted prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using Poisson regression to determine risk factors for carriage.

RESULTS:

A total of 1837 oropharyngeal specimens were obtained from 1478 unique participants. Overall carriage prevalence was 12.7-14.6% during the two survey rounds, with 1.8-2.6% for capsular genotype B, 0.9-1.0% for capsular genotypes C, W, or Y, and 9.9-10.8% for nongroupable strains by rt-PCR. Meningococcal carriage was associated with being male, smoking, party or club attendance, recent antibiotic use (inverse correlation), and recent respiratory infections.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this university setting, the majority of meningococcal carriage was due to nongroupable strains, followed by serogroup B. Further evaluation is needed to understand the dynamics of serogroup B carriage and disease among university students.

KEYWORDS:

Carriage; Meningococcal disease; Meningococcal infections; Meningococcal vaccines; Neisseria meningitidis

PMID:
29183735
PMCID:
PMC5737556
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.11.040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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