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Trends Cogn Sci. 2018 Feb;22(2):111-123. doi: 10.1016/j.tics.2017.11.003. Epub 2017 Nov 25.

Predicting Violent Behavior: What Can Neuroscience Add?

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. Electronic address: poldrack@stanford.edu.
2
School of Law, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.
3
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA.
4
Human Neuroscience Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.
5
Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA.
6
University of California Hastings College of the Law, San Francisco, CA, USA.
7
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.

Abstract

The ability to accurately predict violence and other forms of serious antisocial behavior would provide important societal benefits, and there is substantial enthusiasm for the potential predictive accuracy of neuroimaging techniques. Here, we review the current status of violence prediction using actuarial and clinical methods, and assess the current state of neuroprediction. We then outline several questions that need to be addressed by future studies of neuroprediction if neuroimaging and other neuroscientific markers are to be successfully translated into public policy.

KEYWORDS:

crime; machine learning; neuroimaging; predictive modeling; violence

PMID:
29183655
PMCID:
PMC5794654
[Available on 2019-02-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.tics.2017.11.003

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