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Euro Surveill. 2017 Nov;22(47). doi: 10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2017.22.47.17-00731.

Detection of adamantane-sensitive influenza A(H3N2) viruses in Australia, 2017: a cause for hope?

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne, The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2
WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza, The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
3
School of Global and Population Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

For over a decade virtually all A(H3N2) influenza viruses have been resistant to the adamantane class of antivirals. However, during the 2017 influenza season in Australia, 15/461 (3.3%) adamantane-sensitive A(H3N2) viruses encoding serine at residue 31 of the M2 protein were detected, more than the total number identified globally during the last 6 years. A return to wide circulation of adamantane-sensitive A(H3N2) viruses would revive the option of using these drugs for treatment and prophylaxis.

KEYWORDS:

adamantane resistance; amantadine; antiviral; influenza virus

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