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Nat Microbiol. 2018 Feb;3(2):234-242. doi: 10.1038/s41564-017-0075-5. Epub 2017 Nov 27.

Intergenerational transfer of antibiotic-perturbed microbiota enhances colitis in susceptible mice.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
2
Department of Pathology NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
3
Department of Medicine NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
4
Janssen R&D, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of J&J, Beerse, Belgium.
5
Department of Biology and Health Promotion St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY, USA.
6
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
7
Biotechnology Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
8
Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
9
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA, USA.
10
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
11
Departments of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
12
Department of Microbiology NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. martin.blaser@nyumc.org.
13
Department of Medicine NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. martin.blaser@nyumc.org.
14
New York Harbor Veterans Affairs Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. martin.blaser@nyumc.org.

Abstract

Antibiotic exposure in children has been associated with the risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Antibiotic use in children or in their pregnant mother can affect how the intestinal microbiome develops, so we asked whether the transfer of an antibiotic-perturbed microbiota from mothers to their children could affect their risk of developing IBD. Here we demonstrate that germ-free adult pregnant mice inoculated with a gut microbial community shaped by antibiotic exposure transmitted their perturbed microbiota to their offspring with high fidelity. Without any direct or continued exposure to antibiotics, this dysbiotic microbiota in the offspring remained distinct from controls for at least 21 weeks. By using both IL-10-deficient and wild-type mothers, we showed that both inoculum and genotype shape microbiota populations in the offspring. Because IL10-/- mice are genetically susceptible to colitis, we could assess the risk due to maternal transmission of an antibiotic-perturbed microbiota. We found that the IL10-/- offspring that had received the perturbed gut microbiota developed markedly increased colitis. Taken together, our findings indicate that antibiotic exposure shaping the maternal gut microbiota has effects that extend to the offspring, with both ecological and long-term disease consequences.

Comment in

PMID:
29180726
PMCID:
PMC5780248
DOI:
10.1038/s41564-017-0075-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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