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Am J Psychiatry. 2018 Mar 1;175(3):232-241. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17040404. Epub 2017 Nov 28.

Impact of SSRI Therapy on Risk of Conversion From Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer's Dementia in Individuals With Previous Depression.

Author information

1
From the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany; the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy and the Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany; the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Bonn; and the Max Planck Institute of Experimental Medicine, Göttingen.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Depression is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. Research has shown that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram decreases amyloid-β generation and plaque load. The authors evaluated the impact of SSRI treatment on CSF biomarkers and progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's dementia.

METHOD:

Data sets from 755 currently nondepressed participants from the longitudinal Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and analyses of variance and covariance with ApoE4 status and age as covariates.

RESULTS:

In MCI patients with a history of depression, long-term SSRI treatment (>4 years) was significantly associated with a delayed progression to Alzheimer's dementia by approximately 3 years, compared with short-term SSRI treatment, treatment with other antidepressants, or no treatment and compared with MCI patients without a history of depression. No differences in CSF biomarker levels were observed between treatment groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Long-term SSRI treatment may delay progression from MCI to Alzheimer's dementia.

KEYWORDS:

Dementia-Alzheimer-s Disease; Dementia-Other; Diagnosis And Classification; Geriatric Psychiatry; Psychotherapy

PMID:
29179578
DOI:
10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17040404
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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