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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2018 Jan;26(1):81-87. doi: 10.1002/oby.22069. Epub 2017 Nov 27.

Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention for Migraine: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, The Miriam Hospital/Brown Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.
2
Montefiore Headache Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, New York, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, Rhode Island Hospital/Brown Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Miriam Hospital/Brown Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to test whether behavioral weight loss (BWL) intervention decreases headaches in women with comorbid migraine and overweight or obesity.

METHODS:

This randomized, single-blind trial allocated women 18 to 50 years old with 4 to 20 migraine days per month and a BMI = 25.0-49.9 kg/m2 to 16 weeks of BWL (n = 54), which targeted exercise and eating behaviors for weight loss, or to migraine education control (ME, n = 56), which delivered didactic instruction on migraine and treatments. Participants completed a 4-week smartphone headache diary at baseline, posttreatment (16-20 wk), and follow-up (32-36 wk). The primary outcome was posttreatment change in migraine days per month, analyzed via linear mixed effects models.

RESULTS:

Of 110 participants randomly assigned, 85 (78%) and 80 (73%) completed posttreatment and follow-up. Although the BWL group achieved greater weight loss (mean [95% CI] in kilograms) than the ME group at posttreatment (-3.8 [-2.5 to -5.0] vs. + 0.9 [-0.4 to 2.2], P < 0.001) and follow-up (-3.2 [-2.0 to -4.5] vs. + 1.1 [-0.2 to 2.4], P < 0.001), there were no significant group (BWL vs. ME) differences (mean [95% CI]) in migraine days per month at posttreatment (-3.0 [-2.0 to -4.0] vs. -4.0 [-2.9 to -5.0], P = 0.185) or follow-up (-3.8 [-2.7 to -4.8] vs. -4.4 [-3.4 to -5.5], P = 0.378).

CONCLUSIONS:

Contrary to hypotheses, BWL and ME yielded similar, sustained reductions in migraine headaches. Future research should evaluate whether adding BWL to standard pharmacological and/or nonpharmacological migraine treatment approaches yields greater benefits.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01197196.

PMID:
29178659
PMCID:
PMC5739951
DOI:
10.1002/oby.22069
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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