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Clin Otolaryngol. 2018 Apr;43(2):624-631. doi: 10.1111/coa.13037. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

Core information set for informed consent to surgery for oral or oropharyngeal cancer: A mixed-methods study.

Author information

1
School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
2
University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK.
3
School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To develop a core information set for informed consent to surgery for oral/oropharyngeal surgery. A core information set is baseline information rated important by patients and surgeons and is intended to improve patients' understanding of the intended procedure.

DESIGN:

A mixed-methods study. Systematic reviews of scientific and written healthcare literature, qualitative interviews and observations, Delphi surveys, and group consensus meetings identified information domains of importance for consent.

SETTING:

A regional head and neck clinic in the United Kingdom. Questionnaire participants were recruited from around the UK.

PARTICIPANTS:

Patients about to undergo, or who had previously undergone, surgery for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Healthcare professionals involved in the management of head and neck cancer.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The main outcome was a core information set.

RESULTS:

Systematic reviews, interviews and consultation observations yielded 887 pieces of information that were categorised into 87 information domains. Survey response rates were 67% (n = 50) and 71% (n = 52) for patient and healthcare professional groups in round one. More than 90% responded in each group in the second round. Healthcare professionals were more likely to rate information about short-term or peri-operative events as important while patients rated longer term issues about survival and quality of life. The consensus-building process resulted in an agreed core information set of 13 domains plus two procedure-specific domains about tracheostomy and free-flap surgery.

CONCLUSION:

This study produced a core information set for surgeons and patients to discuss before surgery for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Future work will optimise ways to integrate core information into routine consultations.

PMID:
29178168
DOI:
10.1111/coa.13037

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