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PLoS One. 2017 Nov 27;12(11):e0187999. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0187999. eCollection 2017.

Allergenic food introduction and risk of childhood atopic diseases.

Author information

1
The Generation R Study Group, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Dermatology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Global Public Health, Leiden University College, The Hague, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Allergology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The role of timing and diversity of allergenic food introduction in the development of childhood allergic sensitization and atopic diseases is controversial.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether timing and diversity of allergenic food introduction are associated with allergic sensitization, allergy and eczema in children until age 10 years.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

This study among 5,202 children was performed in a population-based prospective cohort. Timing (age ≤6 months vs. >6 months) and diversity (0, 1, 2 and ≥3 foods) of allergenic food (cow's milk, hen's egg, peanut, tree nuts, soy and gluten) introduction were assessed by questionnaires at ages 6 and 12 months. At age 10 years, inhalant and food allergic sensitization were measured by skin prick tests, and physician-diagnosed inhalant and food allergy by questionnaire. Data on parental-reported physician-diagnosed eczema were obtained from birth until age 10 years.

RESULTS:

Children introduced to gluten at age ≤6 months had a decreased risk of eczema (aOR (95% CI): 0.84 (0.72, 0.99)), compared with children introduced to gluten at age >6 months. However, timing of allergenic food introduction was not associated with allergic sensitization or physician-diagnosed allergy. Children introduced to ≥3 allergenic foods at age ≤6 months had a decreased risk of physician-diagnosed inhalant allergy (0.64 (0.42, 0.98)), compared with children not introduced to any allergenic food at age ≤6 months. However, diversity of allergenic food introduction was not associated with allergic sensitization, physician-diagnosed food allergy or eczema.

CONCLUSION:

Neither timing nor diversity of allergenic food introduction was consistently associated with childhood allergic sensitization, allergy or eczema.

PMID:
29176842
PMCID:
PMC5703454
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0187999
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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