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Sci Rep. 2017 Nov 24;7(1):16232. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-16304-6.

Orthrozanclus elongata n. sp. and the significance of sclerite-covered taxa for early trochozoan evolution.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 39 East Beijing Road, Nanjing, 210008, China. fczhao@nigpas.ac.cn.
2
Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE, UK. martin.smith@durham.ac.uk.
3
State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 39 East Beijing Road, Nanjing, 210008, China.
4
College of Earth Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing, 100049, China.

Abstract

Orthrozanclus is a shell-bearing, sclerite covered Cambrian organism of uncertain taxonomic affinity, seemingly representing an intermediate between its fellow problematica Wiwaxia and Halkieria. Attempts to group these slug-like taxa into a single 'halwaxiid' clade nevertheless present structural and evolutionary difficulties. Here we report a new species of Orthrozanclus from the early Cambrian Chengjiang Lagerstätte. The scleritome arrangement and constitution in this material corroborates the link between Orthrozanclus and Halkieria, but not with Wiwaxia - and calls into question its purported relationship with molluscs. Instead, the tripartite construction of the halkieriid scleritome finds a more compelling parallel in the camenellan tommotiids, relatives of the brachiopods and phoronids. Such a phylogenetic position would indicate the presence of a scleritome in the common ancestor of the three major trochozoan lineages, Mollusca, Annelida and Brachiozoa. On this view, the absence of fossil Ediacaran sclerites is evidence against any 'Precambrian prelude' to the explosive diversification of these phyla in the Cambrian, c. 540-530 million years ago.

PMID:
29176685
PMCID:
PMC5701144
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-16304-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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