Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Commun. 2017 Nov 24;8(1):1781. doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-01901-w.

Plasma cell survival in the absence of B cell memory.

Author information

1
Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 NW 185th Avenue, Beaverton, OR, 97006, USA.
2
Najít Technologies, Inc, 505 NW 185th Avenue, Beaverton, OR, 97006, USA.
3
Department of Biology, Portland State University, 1719 SW 10th Avenue, Portland, OR, 97201, USA.
4
Division of Reproductive Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 NW 185th Avenue, Beaverton, OR, 97006, USA.
5
Biostatistics Shared Resource, Knight Cancer Institute, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Rd., Portland, OR, 97239, USA.
6
Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 NW 185th Avenue, Beaverton, OR, 97006, USA. slifkam@ohsu.edu.

Abstract

Pre-existing serum antibodies play an important role in vaccine-mediated protection against infection but the underlying mechanisms of immune memory are unclear. Clinical studies indicate that antigen-specific antibody responses can be maintained for many years, leading to theories that reactivation/differentiation of memory B cells into plasma cells is required to sustain long-term antibody production. Here, we present a decade-long study in which we demonstrate site-specific survival of bone marrow-derived plasma cells and durable antibody responses to multiple virus and vaccine antigens in rhesus macaques for years after sustained memory B cell depletion. Moreover, BrdU+ cells with plasma cell morphology can be detected for 10 years after vaccination/BrdU administration, indicating that plasma cells may persist for a prolonged period of time in the absence of cell division. On the basis of these results, long-lived plasma cells represent a key cell population responsible for long-term antibody production and serological memory.

PMID:
29176567
PMCID:
PMC5701209
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-017-01901-w
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center