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Nanomedicine. 2018 Feb;14(2):385-395. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2017.11.013. Epub 2017 Nov 22.

Evaluation of cardiovascular responses to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

Author information

1
Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P., Mexico.
2
Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis, S.L.P., Mexico.
3
Facultad de Estomatologia, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P., Mexico.
4
Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P., Mexico. Electronic address: cgonzalez.uaslp@gmail.com.

Abstract

Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used in the medical, pharmaceutical and food industry. Adverse effects and toxicity induced by AgNPs upon cardiac function related to nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative stress (OS) are described. AgNPs-toxicity may be influenced by cardiovascular pathologies such as hypertension. However, the molecules involved under pathophysiological conditions are not well studied. The aim of this work was to evaluate perfusion pressure (PP) and left ventricle pressure (LVP) as physiological parameters of cardiovascular function in response to AgNPs, using isolated perfused hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), and identify the role of NO and OS. The results suggest that AgNPs reduced NO derived from endothelial/inducible NO-synthase and increased OS, leading to increased and sustained vasoconstriction and myocardial contractility. Additionally, the hypertension condition alters phenylephrine (Phe) and acetylcholine (ACh) classic effects. These data suggest that hypertension intensified AgNPs-cardiotoxicity. Nevertheless, the precise mechanism of action is still under elucidation.

KEYWORDS:

Nitric oxide; Oxidative stress; Silver nanoparticles; Spontaneously hypertensive rats

PMID:
29175596
DOI:
10.1016/j.nano.2017.11.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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