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Brain Stimul. 2018 Mar - Apr;11(2):299-301. doi: 10.1016/j.brs.2017.11.009. Epub 2017 Nov 16.

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) prevents chronic stress-induced hyperalgesia in rats.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neuromodulation, Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital & Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Center for Non-invasive Brain Stimulation, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
2
Pain Pharmacology and Neuromodulation Laboratory: Animal Models, Department of Pharmacology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul Institute of Basic Health Sciences, Porto Alegre, RS 90050-170, Brazil; Postgraduate Program in Biological Sciences - Physiology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul Institute of Basic Health Sciences, Porto Alegre, RS 90050-170, Brazil.
3
Pain Pharmacology and Neuromodulation Laboratory: Animal Models, Department of Pharmacology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul Institute of Basic Health Sciences, Porto Alegre, RS 90050-170, Brazil; Postgraduate Program in Medicine, Medical Sciences, Medicine School, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003, Brazil; Unidade de Experimentação Animal, Grupo de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, 90035-003, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
4
Pain Pharmacology and Neuromodulation Laboratory: Animal Models, Department of Pharmacology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul Institute of Basic Health Sciences, Porto Alegre, RS 90050-170, Brazil; Postgraduate Program in Medicine, Medical Sciences, Medicine School, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003, Brazil.
5
Pain Pharmacology and Neuromodulation Laboratory: Animal Models, Department of Pharmacology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul Institute of Basic Health Sciences, Porto Alegre, RS 90050-170, Brazil.
6
Serviço de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento em Engenharia Biomédica, Grupo de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, 90035-003, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.
7
Pain Pharmacology and Neuromodulation Laboratory: Animal Models, Department of Pharmacology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul Institute of Basic Health Sciences, Porto Alegre, RS 90050-170, Brazil; Postgraduate Program in Biological Sciences - Physiology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul Institute of Basic Health Sciences, Porto Alegre, RS 90050-170, Brazil; Postgraduate Program in Medicine, Medical Sciences, Medicine School, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003, Brazil; Unidade de Experimentação Animal, Grupo de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, 90035-003, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. Electronic address: iracitorres@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chronic stress (CS) is associated with a decrease in pain threshold caused by the changes in neural pain circuits. It can be associated to glucocorticoid imbalance with alterations in neural circuitry. Inhibition of stress-induced pain-related neural changes by using techniques that safely induce neuroplasticity such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may prevent hyperalgesia triggered by CS.

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to verify the effect of tDCS performed prior to CS exposure on nociceptive response.

METHODS:

Thirty-two rats were distributed in the following groups: control; stress; sham-tDCS + stress; and tDCS + stress. Bicephalic active tDCS was performed for 8 consecutive days before the CS exposure. The pain threshold was evaluated using a hot plate and tail flick latency (TFL) tests.

RESULTS:

The tDCS exposure increased the pain threshold on stressed rats.

CONCLUSION:

The data obtained indicate that the treatment with bicephalic active tDCS before chronic stress exposure prevents stress-induced hyperalgesia.

KEYWORDS:

BDNF; Chronic stress; Hyperalgesia; tDCS

PMID:
29175003
DOI:
10.1016/j.brs.2017.11.009

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