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Mayo Clin Proc. 2018 Mar;93(3):333-336. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2017.10.011. Epub 2017 Nov 22.

Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Health Outcomes: A Call to Standardize Fitness Categories.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC; Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC; George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. Electronic address: peter.kokkinos@va.gov.
2
Cardiology Division, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA; Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
3
Preventive Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI; Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Rochester, MI.
4
Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC.
5
John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Ochsner Clinical School, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA.
6
George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC.

Abstract

An inverse association between physical activity or fitness status and health outcomes has been reported by several cohort studies. When fitness categories are established in quartiles or quintiles based on the peak exercise capacity achieved, the association is graded. Although significant health benefits of increased cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) have been uniformly reported, the degree of protection has varied substantially between studies. This variability is likely due to varying methods used to define CRF categories, and not considering age, despite its strong effect on CRF. To ameliorate these methodological discrepancies, we propose standardized guidelines by which age-specific CRF categories should be defined.

PMID:
29174511
DOI:
10.1016/j.mayocp.2017.10.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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