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Phys Med. 2017 Oct;42:93-98. doi: 10.1016/j.ejmp.2017.09.117. Epub 2017 Sep 9.

Nuclear and radiological emergencies: Building capacity in medical physics to support response.

Author information

1
International Atomic Energy Agency, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Division of Human Health, Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics Section, Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: theocharisberris@gmail.com.
2
Technische Universität München, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Klinik für Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Ismaninger Str.22, D-81675 Munich, Germany. Electronic address: nuesslin@tum.de.
3
International Atomic Energy Agency, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Division of Human Health, Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics Section, Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: A.Meghzif@gmail.com.
4
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Radiation Studies Branch, Div. of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Atlanta 30341-3717, GA, United States. Electronic address: asa4@cdc.gov.
5
International Atomic Energy Agency, Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Division of Radiation, Office of the Deputy Director General, Incident and Emergency Centre, Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: E.D.Herrera-Reyes@iaea.org.
6
Medical and Technical Director REAC/TS and Clinical Professor, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site, P.O. Box 117, MS 39, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, United States. Electronic address: Nick.Dainiak@orau.org.
7
Executive Officer, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST) 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-city, Chiba 263-8555, Japan. Electronic address: akashi.makoto@qst.go.jp.
8
International Atomic Energy Agency, Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety, Radiation Safety and Monitoring Section, Radiation Protection of Patients Unit, Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, A-1400 Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: D.Gilley@iaea.org.
9
Department of Radiation Health Management, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima 960-1295, Japan. Electronic address: ohtsuru@fmu.ac.jp.

Abstract

Medical physicists represent a valuable asset at the disposal of a structured and planned response to nuclear or radiological emergencies (NREs), especially in the hospital environment. The recognition of this fact led the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) to start a fruitful collaboration aiming to improve education and training of medical physicists so that they may support response efforts in case of NREs. Existing shortcomings in specific technical areas were identified through international consultations supported by the IAEA and led to the development of a project aiming at preparing a specific and standardized training package for medical physicists in support to NREs. The Project was funded through extra-budgetary contribution from Japan within the IAEA Nuclear Safety Action Plan. This paper presents the work accomplished through that project and describes the current steps and future direction for enabling medical physicists to better support response to NREs.

KEYWORDS:

Education and training; Nuclear or radiological emergency; Response

PMID:
29173925
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejmp.2017.09.117
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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