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J Holist Nurs. 2018 Jun;36(2):147-158. doi: 10.1177/0898010117697617. Epub 2017 Mar 22.

Tai Chi for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Pilot Study.

Author information

1
Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System.
2
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Explore the feasibility of a Tai Chi intervention to improve musculoskeletal pain, emotion, cognition, and physical function in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder.

DESIGN:

Two-phase, one-arm quasi-experimental design.

METHOD:

Phase 1: 11 participants completed one Tai Chi session, feasibility questionnaire, and were offered participation in Phase 2, a 12-week Tai Chi intervention. Ten participants participated in Phase 2. Pain intensity, interference, physical function scales, an emotional battery, and cognition tests were used for pre- and postintervention outcome measures. Paired t tests and thematic analysis were used for analysis.

FINDINGS:

In Phase 1, most felt Tai Chi would benefit health (90.9%) and expressed interest in continuing Tai Chi (6.73 out of 7). Phase 2 results showed improvement in fear-affect (raw t = -2.64, p = .03; age adjusted t = -2.90, p = .02), fear-somatic arousal (raw t = -2.53, p = .035), List Sorting Working Memory (raw t = 2.62, p = .031; age adjusted t = 2.96, p = .018), 6-Minute Walk Test ( t = 3.541, p = .008), and current level of Pain Intensity ( t = -4.00, p = .004).

CONCLUSIONS:

Tai Chi is an acceptable, holistic treatment to individuals with musculoskeletal pain and posttraumatic stress disorder. It may reduce pain, improve emotion, memory, and physical function.

KEYWORDS:

Tai Chi; pain and pain management; psychosocial/mental health; trauma/posttrauma

PMID:
29172896
DOI:
10.1177/0898010117697617
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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