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Psychiatry Res. 2018 Jan;259:545-549. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.11.013. Epub 2017 Nov 7.

A 10-year follow-up study of violent victimization in first episode psychosis: Risk and protective factors.

Author information

1
Center for Clinical Psychosis Research, TIPS, Stavanger University Hospital, 4008 Stavanger, Norway; Department of Research and Development, Rogaland A-senter, 4028 Stavanger, Norway. Electronic address: jhl@sus.no.
2
Molde University College, PO.Box 2110, 6402 Molde, Norway; Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, P.O. 4959 Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway.
3
Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, P.O. 4959 Nydalen, N-0424 Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O. 1171 Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway.
4
Center for Clinical Psychosis Research, TIPS, Stavanger University Hospital, 4008 Stavanger, Norway; Network for Medical Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of 4036 Stavanger, Norway.
5
Center for Clinical Psychosis Research, TIPS, Stavanger University Hospital, 4008 Stavanger, Norway; Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Jonas Lies vei 65, 5021 Bergen, Norway.
6
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, P.O. 1094 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway; Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, 3004 Drammen, Norway.
7
Psychiatric Research Unit, Region Zealand, Faelledvej 6, 4200 Slagelse, Denmark; University of Copenhagen, P.O. box 2177, Copenhagen, Denmark.
8
Department of Behavioral Sciences in Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O. 1130 Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway.
9
Center for Clinical Psychosis Research, TIPS, Stavanger University Hospital, 4008 Stavanger, Norway.
10
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, Yale Psychiatric Research at Congress Place, 301 Cedar St., New Haven, CT 06519, USA.

Abstract

Violent victimization in persons with severe mental illness has long-term adverse consequences. Little is known about the long-term prevalence of victimization in first episode psychosis, or about factors affecting victimization throughout the course of illness. To assess the prevalence of violent victimization during a 10-year follow-up period in a group of first episode psychosis (FEP) patients, and to identify early predictors and risk factors for victimization. A prospective design was used with comprehensive assessments of violent victimization, treatment variables and functioning at baseline and during 10-year follow-up. A clinical epidemiological sample of FEP patients (n = 298) was studied. FEP patients in our study were at a 3.5 times greater risk of victimization as compared to the normal population. During the 10-year follow-up period, 23% of subjects fell victim to one or more violent assaults. Victimized patients were younger and reported less occupational activity. At 10-year follow-up, victimization was associated with more concomitant drug use, alcohol misuse and violent behavior, but not with a worse clinical or functional outcome. Treatment programs should focus on risk factors for victimization and develop behavioral alternatives to mitigate risk in FEP patients.

PMID:
29172178
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2017.11.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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