Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2018 Mar;27(3):801-805. doi: 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2017.10.017. Epub 2017 Nov 21.

Relationship between Risk Factor Control and Compliance with a Lifestyle Modification Program in the Stenting Aggressive Medical Management for Prevention of Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis Trial.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.
2
Department of Neurology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina. Electronic address: alkasab@musc.edu.
3
Department of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.
4
Department of Radiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa.
5
Department of Neurosurgery, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York.
6
Division of Clinical Research, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, Maryland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Lifestyle modification programs have improved the achievement of risk factor targets in a variety of clinical settings, including patients who have previously suffered a stroke or transient ischemic attack and those with multiple risk factors. Stenting Aggressive Medical Management for Prevention of Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) was the first vascular disease prevention trial to provide a commercially available lifestyle modification program to enhance risk factor control. We sought to determine the relationship between compliance with this program and risk factor control in SAMMPRIS.

METHODS:

SAMMPRIS aggressive medical management included a telephonic lifestyle modification program provided free of charge to all subjects (n = 451) during their participation in the study. Subjects with fewer than 3 expected lifestyle-coaching calls were excluded from these analyses. Compliant subjects (n = 201) had  greater than or equal to 78.5% of calls (median % of completed/expected calls). Noncompliant subjects (n = 200) had less than 78.5% of calls or refused to participate. Mean risk factor values or % in-target for each risk factor was compared between compliant versus noncompliant subjects, using t tests and chi-square tests. Risk factor changes from baseline to follow-up were compared between the groups to account for baseline differences.

RESULTS:

Compliant subjects had better risk factor control throughout follow-up for low-density lipoprotein, systolic blood pressure (SBP), hemoglobin A1c (HgA1c), non-high-density lipoprotein, nonsmoking, and exercise than noncompliant subjects, but there was no difference for body mass index. After adjusting for baseline differences between the groups, compliant subjects had a greater change from baseline than noncompliant subjects for SBP did at 24 months and HgA1c at 6 months.

CONCLUSION:

SAMMPRIS subjects who were compliant with the lifestyle modification program had better risk factor control during the study for almost all risk factors.

KEYWORDS:

Stroke; compliance; intracranial atherosclerosis; lifestyle modification program; medical management

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center