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J Chin Med Assoc. 2018 Feb;81(2):94-101. doi: 10.1016/j.jcma.2017.11.002. Epub 2017 Nov 21.

Wound healing.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC; Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC; Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC; Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC. Electronic address: phwang@vghtpe.gov.tw.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC; Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC; Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC; Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC; Institute of BioMedical Informatics, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC.

Abstract

Wound healing is an important physiological process to maintain the integrity of skin after trauma, either by accident or by intent procedure. The normal wound healing involves three successive but overlapping phases, including hemostasis/inflammatory phase, proliferative phase, and remodeling phase. Aberration of wound healing, such as excessive wound healing (hypertrophic scar and keloid) or chronic wound (ulcer) impairs the normal physical function. A large number of sophisticated experimental studies have provided insights into wound healing. This article highlights the information after 2010, and the main text includes (i) wound healing; (ii) wound healing in fetus and adult; (iii) prostaglandins and wound healing; (iv) the pathogenesis of excessive wound healing; (v) the epidemiology of excessive wound healing; (vi) in vitro and in vivo studies for excessive wound healing; (vii) stem cell therapy for excessive wound healing; and (viii) the prevention strategy for excessive wound healing.

KEYWORDS:

Pathophysiology; Wound healing

PMID:
29169897
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcma.2017.11.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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