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J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2017 Dec 1;18(12):1098.e1-1098.e11. doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2017.09.018.

Utilization of Antibiotics in Long-Term Care Facilities in British Columbia, Canada.

Author information

1
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address: Fawziah@mail.ubc.ca.
2
British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
3
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
4
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
5
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Antibiotic use is highly prevalent in long-term care facilities (LTCFs); a resident's annual exposure to at least 1 course of antibiotic is approximately 50% to 80%. The objective of this study was to understand the extent of antibiotic use in the population of residents in British Columbia's (BC) LTCFs from 2007 to 2014.

METHODS:

Antibiotic prescription data for LTCF residents was extracted from the central prescription database and linked to the physician billing plan to obtain antibiotic indication. Total defined daily dose (DDD) per 1000 residents per day was calculated.

RESULTS:

Our database had 381 LTCFs with an average of nearly 24,694 residents annually and 419,036 antibiotic prescriptions. Antibiotic utilization did not change dramatically between 2007 and 2014, ranging from 39.2 in 2007 to 35.2 DDD per 1000 residents per day in 2014. Although usage of most antibiotics declined, use of moxifloxacin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, doxycycline, and amoxicillin increased significantly. The indication most frequently linked to prescription was urinary tract infection (6.58 DDD per 1000 residents per day), with nitrofurantoin, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole being the most commonly prescribed agents. This was followed closely by prescriptions for respiratory infections (5.34 DDD per 1000 residents per day), with moxifloxacin being the most commonly prescribed antibiotic, primarily for upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), whereas doxycycline is used commonly for lower respiratory tract infection. Duration of antibiotic therapy in LTCF residents has decreased significantly from 9.29 days to 7.3 days per prescription in 2014.

CONCLUSION:

Antibiotic use in LTCFs is high relative to the general population. Our study underscores that stewardship in LTCFs should continue to focus on length of treatment, appropriate detection of urinary tract infections, and avoidance of treating URTIs with antibiotics.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotics; antimicrobial stewardship; long-term care; residential

PMID:
29169741
DOI:
10.1016/j.jamda.2017.09.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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