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Br J Radiol. 2018 Feb;91(1083):20170641. doi: 10.1259/bjr.20170641. Epub 2018 Jan 17.

Focused ultrasound: tumour ablation and its potential to enhance immunological therapy to cancer.

Author information

1
1 Deparmtent of interventional radiology, European istitute of oncology , Milan , Italy.
2
2 Postgraduate School of Radiology, Università degli Studi di Milano , Milan , Italy.
3
3 Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan , Ann Arbor, MI , USA.
4
4 Department of Radiology and diagnotic imaging, Poliambulazna di Brescia , Brescia , Italy.
5
5 Department of Neurosurgery, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta , Milan , Italy.
6
6 Department of Neurological surgery, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center , Charlottesville, VA , USA.
7
7 Focused Ultrasound Foundation , Charlottesville, VA , USA.

Abstract

Various kinds of image-guided techniques have been successfully applied in the last years for the treatment of tumours, as alternative to surgical resection. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a novel, totally non-invasive, image-guided technique that allows for achieving tissue destruction with the application of focused ultrasound at high intensity. This technique has been successfully applied for the treatment of a large variety of diseases, including oncological and non-oncological diseases. One of the most fascinating aspects of image-guided ablations, and particularly of HIFU, is the reported possibility of determining a sort of stimulation of the immune system, with an unexpected "systemic" response to treatments designed to be "local". In the present article the mechanisms of action of HIFU are described, and the main clinical applications of this technique are reported, with a particular focus on the immune-stimulation process that might originate from tumour ablations.

PMID:
29168922
PMCID:
PMC5965486
DOI:
10.1259/bjr.20170641
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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