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AIDS Behav. 2018 Oct;22(10):3234-3243. doi: 10.1007/s10461-017-1993-1.

Predicting Arrest in a Sample of Youth Perinatally Exposed to HIV: The Intersection of HIV and Key Contextual Factors.

Author information

1
HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, #15, New York, NY, 10032, USA. ke2143@cumc.columbia.edu.
2
ICAP, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, NY, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.
4
HIV Center for Clinical and Behavioral Studies, Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, #15, New York, NY, 10032, USA.

Abstract

We examined the role of youth HIV status and other key factors on past-year arrest in perinatally HIV-exposed but uninfected (PHIV-) and perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) youth using data from a multi-site study of psychosocial behaviors in PHIV-exposed urban youth (N = 340; 61% PHIV+; 51% female; ages 9-16 at baseline). Youth and caregivers were administered 5 interviews, spanning approximately 7.5 years. Using longitudinal logistic mixed-effect models, we explored the association between past year arrest, internal [e.g., substance use disorder (SUD)] and external (e.g., neighborhood arrest rates) contextual factors, and social-regulation processes (e.g., in-school/work). Arrest rates increased from 2.6 to 19.7% across follow-ups; there were no differences in arrest over time by HIV status. In the final model, odds of arrest were greater for youth who were male, with SUD, ≥ 18 years old, with high levels of city stress, and neither in school nor employed. PHIV-exposed, urban youth have much higher rates of arrest than national samples. Lack of differences in arrest by HIV status suggests key contextual factors are more important in promoting arrest.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescence; Arrest; Longitudinal; Perinatal HIV; Youth

PMID:
29168068
PMCID:
PMC6462435
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-017-1993-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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