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Acad Med. 2018 Jul;93(7):979-984. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000002013.

Restoring Faculty Vitality in Academic Medicine When Burnout Threatens.

Author information

1
D.T. Shah is professor of pathology, and associate dean, Office of Faculty Affairs and Professional Development, Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Huntington, West Virginia. She is past chair (2016-2018), Association of American Medical Colleges Group on Faculty Affairs. V.N. Williams is Presidential Professor, Graduate College, and vice provost for academic affairs and faculty development, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. She is former associate dean for faculty affairs, University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. She is past chair (2007-2008), Association of American Medical Colleges Group on Faculty Affairs. L.E. Thorndyke is professor of medicine and vice provost for faculty affairs, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts. She is past chair (2012-2013), Association of American Medical Colleges Group on Faculty Affairs. E.E. Marsh is professor of neurology and professor, Department of Educational Affairs, Penn State College of Medicine, University Park Regional Campus, State College, Pennsylvania. He is a steering committee member, Association of American Medical Colleges Group on Faculty Affairs. R.E. Sonnino is professor of pediatric surgery (retired), Department of Surgery, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. She is past chair (2014-2015), Association of American Medical Colleges Group on Faculty Affairs. S.M. Block is professor of pediatrics, emeritus, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He is past chair (2013-2014), Association of American Medical Colleges Group on Faculty Affairs. T.R. Viggiano is Barbara Woodward Lips Professor of Medical Education and Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. He is the founding chair (2006-2007), Association of American Medical Colleges Group on Faculty Affairs.

Abstract

Increasing rates of burnout-with accompanying stress and lack of engagement-among faculty, residents, students, and practicing physicians have caused alarm in academic medicine. Central to the debate among academic medicine's stakeholders are oft-competing issues of social accountability; cost containment; effectiveness of academic medicine's institutions; faculty recruitment, retention, and satisfaction; increasing expectations for faculty; and mission-based productivity.The authors propose that understanding and fostering what contributes to faculty and institutional vitality is central to preventing burnout during times of change. They first look at faculty vitality and how it is threatened by burnout, to provide a framework for a greater understanding of faculty well-being. Then they draw on higher education literature to determine how vitality is defined in academic settings and what factors affect faculty vitality within the context of academic medicine. Next, they propose a model to explain and examine faculty vitality in academic medicine, followed by a discussion of the need for a greater understanding of faculty vitality. Finally, the authors offer conclusions and propose future directions to promote faculty vitality.The authors encourage institutional decision makers and other stakeholders to focus particular attention on the evolving expectations for faculty, the risk of extensive faculty burnout, and the opportunity to reduce burnout by improving the vitality and resilience of these talented and crucial contributors. Faculty vitality, as defined by the institution, has a critical role in ensuring future institutional successes and the capacity for faculty to thrive in a complex health care economy.

PMID:
29166355
PMCID:
PMC6169302
DOI:
10.1097/ACM.0000000000002013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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