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Environ Health Prev Med. 2017 Jun 8;22(1):52. doi: 10.1186/s12199-017-0656-1.

Association of excessive mobile phone use during pregnancy with birth weight: an adjunct study in Kumamoto of Japan Environment and Children's Study.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto, Japan. lucyk1984@hotmail.com.
2
The Southern Kyushu and Okinawa Unit Center, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto, Japan.
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto City, Japan.
4
Department of Neonatology, Kumamoto University Hospital, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto, Japan.
5
Department of Public Health, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Low birth weight has been shown to be closely associated with neonatal mortality and morbidity, inhibited growth, poor cognitive development, and chronic diseases later in life. Some studies have also shown that excessive mobile phone use in the postnatal period may lead to behavioral complications in the children during their growing years; however, the relationship between mobile phone use during pregnancy and neonatal birth weight is not clear. The aim of the present study was to determine the associations of excessive mobile phone use with neonatal birth weight and infant health status.

METHODS:

A sample of 461 mother and child pairs participated in a survey on maternal characteristics, infant characteristics, and maternal mobile phone usage information during pregnancy.

RESULTS:

Our results showed that pregnant women tend to excessively use mobile phones in Japan. The mean infant birth weight was lower in the excessive use group than in the ordinary use group, and the frequency of infant emergency transport was significantly higher in the excessive use group than in the ordinary use group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Excessive mobile phone use during pregnancy may be a risk factor for lower birth weight and a high rate of infant emergency transport.

PMID:
29165149
PMCID:
PMC5664573
DOI:
10.1186/s12199-017-0656-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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