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Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2018 Jun;70(6):908-917. doi: 10.1002/acr.23412. Epub 2018 Apr 18.

Peer-to-Peer Mentoring for African American Women With Lupus: A Feasibility Pilot.

Author information

1
Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston.
2
Medical University of South Carolina and Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston.
3
Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Erratum in

  • Errata. [Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2018]

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the feasibility and potential benefits of peer mentoring to improve the disease self-management and quality of life of individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

METHODS:

Peer mentors were trained and paired with up to 3 mentees to receive self-management education and support by telephone over 12 weeks. This study took place at an academic teaching hospital in Charleston, South Carolina. Seven quads consisting of 1 peer mentor and 3 mentees were matched, based on factors such as age, area of residence, and marital and work status. Mentee outcomes of self-management, health-related quality of life, and disease activity were measured using validated tools at baseline, mid-intervention, and post-intervention. Descriptive statistics and effect sizes were calculated to determine clinically important (>0.3) changes from baseline.

RESULTS:

Mentees showed trends toward lower disease activity (P = 0.004) and improved health-related quality of life, in the form of decreased anxiety (P = 0.018) and decreased depression (P = 0.057). Other improvements in health-related quality of life were observed with effect sizes >0.3, but did not reach statistical significance. In addition, both mentees and mentors gave very high scores for perceived treatment credibility and service delivery.

CONCLUSION:

The intervention was well received. Training, the peer-mentoring program, and outcome measures were demonstrated to be feasible with modifications. This result provides preliminary support for the efficacy, acceptability, and perceived credibility of a peer-mentoring approach to improve disease self-management and health-related quality of life in African American women with SLE. Peer mentoring may augment current rheumatologic care.

PMID:
29161471
PMCID:
PMC5962359
[Available on 2019-06-01]
DOI:
10.1002/acr.23412

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