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PLoS One. 2017 Nov 21;12(11):e0188302. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0188302. eCollection 2017.

In-vivo effects of intraocular and intracranial pressures on the lamina cribrosa microstructure.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Eye Center, Eye and Ear Institute, Ophthalmology and Visual Science Research Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
2
Department of Bioengineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
3
New York University Langone Eye Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America.
4
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.

Abstract

There is increasing clinical evidence that the eye is not only affected by intraocular pressure (IOP), but also by intracranial pressure (ICP). Both pressures meet at the optic nerve head of the eye, specifically the lamina cribrosa (LC). The LC is a collagenous meshwork through which all retinal ganglion cell axons pass on their way to the brain. Distortion of the LC causes a biological cascade leading to neuropathy and impaired vision in situations such as glaucoma and idiopathic intracranial hypertension. While the effect of IOP on the LC has been studied extensively, the coupled effects of IOP and ICP on the LC remain poorly understood. We investigated in-vivo the effects of IOP and ICP, controlled via cannulation of the eye and lateral ventricle in the brain, on the LC microstructure of anesthetized rhesus monkeys eyes using the Bioptigen spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) device (Research Triangle, NC). The animals were imaged with their head upright and the rest of their body lying prone on a surgical table. The LC was imaged at a variety of IOP/ICP combinations, and microstructural parameters, such as the thickness of the LC collagenous beams and diameter of the pores were analyzed. LC microstructure was confirmed by histology. We determined that LC microstructure deformed in response to both IOP and ICP changes, with significant interaction between the two. These findings emphasize the importance of considering both IOP and ICP when assessing optic nerve health.

PMID:
29161320
PMCID:
PMC5697865
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0188302
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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