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Sleep Med. 2017 Nov;39:87-94. doi: 10.1016/j.sleep.2017.07.027. Epub 2017 Sep 9.

Short sleep duration, shift work, and actual days taken off work are predictive life-style risk factors for new-onset metabolic syndrome: a seven-year cohort study of 40,000 male workers.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Oita University, Oita, Japan.
2
Division of Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: nusmpublichealth@gmail.com.
3
Division of Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This longitudinal study investigated the effects of various lifestyle-related factors - including sleep duration, shift work, and actual days taken off work - on new-onset metabolic syndrome (MetS).

METHODS AND RESULTS:

A total of 39,182 male employees (mean age 42.4 ± 9.8 years) of a local government organization in Japan were followed up for a maximum of seven years, between 1999 and 2006. Multivariate analysis (Cox proportional hazard method) identified seven high-risk lifestyle factors that were significantly associated with new-onset MetS or a range of metabolic factors (obesity, hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia): (1) short sleep duration (<5 h/day), (2) shift work, (3) insufficient number of days off work, (4) always eating until satiety, (5) not trying to take every opportunity to walk, (6) alcohol intake ≥60 g/day, and (7) smoking. In addition, a higher number of these high-risk lifestyle factors significantly promoted the onset of MetS. The hazard ratio for MetS associated with 0-1 high-risk lifestyle parameters per subject at the baseline was set at 1.00. Hazard ratios associated with the following numbers of high-risk lifestyle parameters were: 1.22 (95% CI 1.15-1.29) for 2-3 of these parameters; and 1.43 (1.33-1.54) for 4-7.

CONCLUSION:

An increase in the number of high-risk lifestyle factors - such as short sleep duration, shift work, and an insufficient number of days off work - increased the risk of MetS onset. Comprehensive strategies to improve a range of lifestyle factors for workers, such as sleep duration and days off work, could reduce the risk of MetS onset.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes mellitus; Dyslipidemias; Holidays; Hypertension; Longitudinal studies; Obesity

PMID:
29157594
DOI:
10.1016/j.sleep.2017.07.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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