Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Int. 2018 Feb;111:1-13. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2017.11.008. Epub 2017 Nov 20.

Early life exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances and mid-childhood lipid and alanine aminotransferase levels.

Author information

1
Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH), School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA; Central American Institute for Studies on Toxic Substances, Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica. Electronic address: animora@berkeley.edu.
2
Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME, USA; Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Portland, ME, USA.
3
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
5
Central American Institute for Studies on Toxic Substances, Universidad Nacional, Heredia, Costa Rica.
6
Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
8
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
9
Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH), School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA; Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Growing evidence suggests that exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) may disrupt lipid homeostasis and liver function, but data in children are limited.

OBJECTIVE:

We examined the association of prenatal and mid-childhood PFAS exposure with lipids and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in children.

METHODS:

We studied 682 mother-child pairs from a Boston-area pre-birth cohort. We quantified PFASs in maternal plasma collected in pregnancy (median 9.7weeks gestation, 1999-2002) and in child plasma collected in mid-childhood (median age 7.7years, 2007-2010). In mid-childhood we also measured fasting total (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), and ALT. We then derived low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) from TC, HDL-C, and TG using the Friedewald formula.

RESULTS:

Median (interquartile range, IQR) perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), and perfluorodecanoate (PFDeA) concentrations in child plasma were 6.2 (5.5), 4.3 (3.0), and 0.3 (0.3) ng/mL, respectively. Among girls, higher child PFOS, PFOA, and PFDeA concentrations were associated with detrimental changes in the lipid profile, including higher TC and/or LDL-C [e.g., β per IQR increment in PFOS=4.0mg/dL (95% CI: 0.3, 7.8) for TC and 2.6mg/dL (-0.5, 5.8) for LDL-C]. However, among both boys and girls, higher plasma concentrations of these child PFASs were also associated with higher HDL-C, which predicts better cardiovascular health, and slightly lower ALT, which may indicate better liver function. Prenatal PFAS concentrations were also modestly associated with improved childhood lipid and ALT levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data suggest that prenatal and mid-childhood PFAS exposure may be associated with modest, but somewhat conflicting changes in the lipid profile and ALT levels in children.

KEYWORDS:

Childhood; Lipids; Liver function; Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances; Pregnancy

PMID:
29156323
PMCID:
PMC5801004
[Available on 2019-02-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2017.11.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center