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Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2018 Feb;88(2):303-310. doi: 10.1111/cen.13519. Epub 2017 Dec 14.

Long-term cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients treated for differentiated thyroid cancer.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
2
Tipotie Health Centre, Social and Health Services, City of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
4
Department of Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
5
Department of Medicine, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
6
Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
7
Heart Center Co., Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
8
Päijät-Häme Central Hospital, Lahti, Finland.
9
Department of Oncology, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
10
Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
11
Division of Internal Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Thyroid hormone suppression therapy has been widely used in the treatment of thyroid cancer, but concerns have been raised about the cardiovascular risks of this treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate long-term cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients treated for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and to assess the effect of TSH suppression and radioiodine (RAI) treatment on the cardiovascular outcome.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study.

PATIENTS AND MEASUREMENTS:

Patients (n = 901) treated for DTC between 1981 and 2002 at 2 Finnish University hospitals were compared with a randomly chosen reference group (n = 4485) matched for age, gender and the place of residence. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to estimate the risk of morbidity or death due to different cardiovascular diseases (CVD) after the diagnosis of DTC.

RESULTS:

Morbidity due to any CVD (hazard ratio [HR] 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.28) and due to all arrhythmias (HR 1.25, CI 1.06-1.48) and atrial fibrillation (AF) (HR 1.29, CI 1.06-1.57) was more frequent in the DTC patients than in the controls. The increased cardiovascular morbidity was confined to patients with a mean TSH level below 0.1 mU/L (HR 1.27, CI 1.03-1.58) and to those treated with RAI (HR 1.18, CI 1.05-1.31). Cardiovascular mortality, however, was lower among the patients than the controls (HR 0.73, CI 0.58-0.92), due to a lower mortality from coronary artery disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

Differentiated thyroid cancer patients have an increased CVD morbidity, which is mostly accountable to AF and to TSH suppression below 0.1 mU/L.

KEYWORDS:

atrial fibrillation; cardiovascular diseases; follow-up studies; iodine radioisotopes; mortality; thyroid hormones; thyroid neoplasms

PMID:
29154445
DOI:
10.1111/cen.13519
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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