Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Nov 17;14(11). pii: E1403. doi: 10.3390/ijerph14111403.

Quit Methods Used by American Smokers, 2013-2014.

Author information

1
James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, 505 South Hancock Street, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. brad.rodu@louisville.edu.
2
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. brad.rodu@louisville.edu.
3
James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, 505 South Hancock Street, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. nantaporn.plurphanswat@louisville.edu.

Abstract

This report describes the quit methods used in the past 12 months by current and former smokers in the baseline Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study during 2013-2014. Descriptive statistics were used to report the use of single and two or more quit methods; survey weights were used to compute population estimates. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between past year former smokers and single quit method, including individual characteristics.

RESULTS:

Of 11,402 current smokers and 4919 former smokers, 4541 had tried and 839 had quit in the past 12 months. Unaided quit attempts were the most common; the number was almost as high as all single methods combined (n = 1797 and n = 1831 respectively). The most frequently used single method was help from friends and family (n = 676) followed by e-cigarettes (n = 587). Use of e-cigarettes was the only method with higher odds of users being a former smoker than unaided attempts (OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.12-1.81). Current use of e-cigarettes among current (34%) and former (54%) smokers was significantly higher than current use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT).

CONCLUSIONS:

In 2013-2014 e-cigarettes were used by American adult smokers as quit-smoking aids more frequently than NRT products or prescription drugs.

KEYWORDS:

NRT; e-cigarettes; pharmaceutical nicotine; quit-smoking attempts; smoking cessation

PMID:
29149048
PMCID:
PMC5708042
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph14111403
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center