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Nat Commun. 2017 Nov 17;8(1):1570. doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-01658-2.

Regulation of gene expression and RNA editing in Drosophila adapting to divergent microclimates.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.
2
Biophysics Program, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.
3
Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, Haifa, 3498838, Israel.
4
Institute of Apicultural Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 100093, Beijing, China.
5
Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA.
6
Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, Blacksburg, VA, 24060, USA.
7
Biocomplexity Institute, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, USA.
8
Center for One Health Research, Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA, 24060, USA.
9
Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, Haifa, 3498838, Israel. nevo@research.haifa.ac.il.
10
Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. jin.billy.li@stanford.edu.
11
Biophysics Program, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. jin.billy.li@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Determining the mechanisms by which a species adapts to its environment is a key endeavor in the study of evolution. In particular, relatively little is known about how transcriptional processes are fine-tuned to adjust to different environmental conditions. Here we study Drosophila melanogaster from 'Evolution Canyon' in Israel, which consists of two opposing slopes with divergent microclimates. We identify several hundred differentially expressed genes and dozens of differentially edited sites between flies from each slope, correlate these changes with genetic differences, and use CRISPR mutagenesis to validate that an intronic SNP in prominin regulates its editing levels. We also demonstrate that while temperature affects editing levels at more sites than genetic differences, genetically regulated sites tend to be less affected by temperature. This work shows the extent to which gene expression and RNA editing differ between flies from different microclimates, and provides insights into the regulation responsible for these differences.

PMID:
29146998
PMCID:
PMC5691062
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-017-01658-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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