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Am J Cardiol. 2018 Jan 1;121(1):14-20. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2017.09.013. Epub 2017 Oct 10.

Performance of J-CTO and PROGRESS CTO Scores in Predicting Angiographic Success and Long-term Outcomes of Percutaneous Coronary Interventions for Chronic Total Occlusions.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia; Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.
2
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia; Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Soon Chun Hyang University College of Medicine, Soon Chun Hyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Republic of Korea.
3
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
4
Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.
5
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia; Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju Severance Christian Hospital, Wonju, Republic of Korea.
6
Division of Cardiology, Center for Interventional Vascular Therapy, New York Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University, New York, New York.
7
Minneapolis Heart Institute, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
8
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: hsamady@emory.edu.

Abstract

Patient selection for and predicting clinical outcomes of chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) remain challenging. We hypothesized that both J-CTO (Multicenter Chronic Total Occlusion Registry of Japan) and PROGRESS CTO (Prospective Global Registry for the Study of Chronic Total Occlusion Intervention) scores will predict not only angiographic success but also long-term clinical outcomes of the patients who underwent PCI of CTO. Of 325 CTO PCIs performed at 2 Emory University hospitals from January 2012 to August 2015, 249 patients with complete baseline clinical, angiographic and follow-up data, were included in this analysis. Major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) consisted of a composite of death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization. Mean age was 63 ± 11 years old and mean follow-up was 19.8 ± 13.1 months. Angiographic success rates increased from 74.5% in 2012 to 85.7% in 2015. Greater J-CTO and PROGRESS CTO scores were not only associated with lower likelihood of angiographic success but also higher rates of long-term MACE. Compared with the scores of 0 to 2, J-CTO and PROGRESS CTO scores of ≥3 were associated with higher MACE. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that PROGRESS CTO scores of ≥3, male sex, and peripheral vascular disease were independent predictors of MACE. In conclusion, J-CTO and PROGRESS CTO scores are useful in predicting procedural success. In addition, the PROGRESS CTO score, and to a lesser degree J-CTO score, have predictive value for long-term outcomes in patients who underwent CTO PCI.

PMID:
29146022
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjcard.2017.09.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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