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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2018 May;66(5):886-894. doi: 10.1111/jgs.15201. Epub 2017 Nov 16.

Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Mortality in Women Aged 63 to 99.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York.
2
Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois.
3
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
4
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
5
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, California.
6
Department of Medicine, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama.
7
Departments of Epidemiology and Medicine, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts.
8
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.
9
Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
10
Department of Family Medicine and Epidemiology, Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.
11
Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To prospectively examine associations between accelerometer-measured physical activity (PA) and mortality in older women, with an emphasis on light-intensity PA.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study with baseline data collection between March 2012 and April 2014.

SETTING:

Women's Health Initiative cohort in the United States.

PARTICIPANTS:

Community-dwelling women aged 63 to 99 (N = 6,382).

MEASUREMENTS:

Minutes per day of usual PA measured using hip-worn triaxial accelerometers, physical functioning measured using the Short Physical Performance Battery, mortality follow-up for a mean 3.1 years through September 2016 (450 deaths).

RESULTS:

When adjusted for accelerometer wear time, age, race-ethnicity, education, smoking, alcohol, self-rated health, and comorbidities, relative risks (95% confidence intervals) for all-cause mortality across PA tertiles were 1.00 (referent), 0.86 (0.69, 1.08), 0.80 (0.62, 1.03) trend P = .07, for low light; 1.00, 0.57 (0.45, 0.71), 0.47 (0.35, 0.61) trend P < .001, for high light; and, 1.00, 0.63 (0.50, 0.79), 0.42 (0.30, 0.57) trend P < .001, for moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA). Associations remained significant for high light-intensity PA and MVPA (P < .001) after further adjustment for physical function. Each 30-min/d increment in light-intensity (low and high combined) PA and MVPA was associated, on average, with multivariable relative risk reductions of 12% and 39%, respectively (P < .01). After further simultaneous adjusting for light intensity and MVPA, the inverse associations remained significant (light-intensity PA: RR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.89-0.97; MVPA: RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.58-0.78). These relative risks did not differ between subgroups for age or race and ethnicity (interaction, P ≥ .14, all).

CONCLUSION:

When measured using accelerometers, light-intensity and MVPA are associated with lower mortality in older women. These findings suggest that replacing sedentary time with light-intensity PA is a public health strategy that could benefit an aging society and warrants further investigation.

KEYWORDS:

aging; epidemiology; longevity; physical activity; women's health

PMID:
29143320
PMCID:
PMC5955801
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.15201
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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