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Oncol Rep. 2018 Jan;39(1):53-60. doi: 10.3892/or.2017.6086. Epub 2017 Nov 9.

Placenta-specific protein 1 promotes cell proliferation and invasion in non-small cell lung cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Gulou, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, P.R. China.
2
Department of Digestive, First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Gulou, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, P.R. China.
3
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Gulou, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, P.R. China.
4
Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Gulou, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, P.R. China.
5
Department of Biochemistry, Nanjing Medical University, Gulou, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, P.R. China.

Abstract

Pulmonary carcinoma-associated proteins have emerged as crucial players in governing fundamental biological processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis and metastasis in human cancers. Placenta-specific protein 1 (PLAC1) is a cancer-related protein, which is activated and upregulated in a variety of malignant tissues, including prostate cancer, gastric adenocarcinoma, colorectal, epithelial ovarian and breast cancer. However, its biological role and clinical significance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) development and progression are still unknown. In the present study, we found that PLAC1 was significantly upregulated in NSCLC tissues, and its expression level was associated with advanced pathological stage and it was also correlated with shorter progression-free survival of lung cancer patients. Furthermore, knockdown of PLAC1 expression by siRNA inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and impaired invasive ability in NSCLC cells partly via regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related protein expression. Our findings present that increased PLAC1 could be identified as a negative prognostic biomarker in NSCLC and regulate cell proliferation and invasion. Thus, we conclusively demonstrated that PLAC1 plays a key role in NSCLC development and progression, which may provide novel insights on the function of tumor-related gene-driven tumorigenesis.

PMID:
29138842
PMCID:
PMC5783604
DOI:
10.3892/or.2017.6086
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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