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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2018 Apr;99(4):623-628. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.10.017. Epub 2017 Nov 11.

Sarcopenia in Peripheral Arterial Disease: Prevalence and Effect on Functional Status.

Author information

1
Veterans Affairs Medical Center Baltimore, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), Baltimore, MD; Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: oaddison@som.umaryland.edu.
2
Veterans Affairs Medical Center Baltimore, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), Baltimore, MD; Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.
3
Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, MD.
4
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

(1) To determine the prevalence of sarcopenia in older men with peripheral arterial disease (PAD); (2) to compare a subgroup of the group with age-, race-, sex-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched non-PAD control counterparts, and (3) to compare the functional status of those with PAD with and without sarcopenia.

DESIGN:

Cohort study.

SETTING:

Medical center.

PARTICIPANTS:

Sedentary community-dwelling men (N=108; age, >50y) with a confirmed diagnosis of PAD (44% blacks; BMI, 27.8±0.4kg/m2; ankle-brachial index, .62±.01).

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans were used to assess appendicular lean mass and determine the prevalence of sarcopenia by/height2. Treadmill tests were used to determine claudication onset time, peak walking time, and claudication recovery time. 6-Minute walk distance was also measured.

RESULTS:

Sarcopenia prevalence in our PAD cohort was 25%. The PAD subgroup (n=42) matched with control counterparts in terms of race, sex, age, and BMI had higher prevalence rates than did their non-PAD counterparts (23.8% vs 2.4%; P<.05). Individuals with sarcopenia (n=28) had a shorter 6-minute walk distance (326±18.8m vs 380±9.7m; P<.05) and higher claudication recovery time (592±98s vs 395±29s; P<.05) than did individuals with PAD but without sarcopenia (n=80). There was no difference in claudication onset time or peak walking time between the PAD groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Men with PAD demonstrate a high prevalence of sarcopenia. Those with sarcopenia and PAD demonstrate decreased mobility function.

KEYWORDS:

Muscles; Peripheral arterial disease; Rehabilitation; Sarcopenia

PMID:
29138051
PMCID:
PMC5871593
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2017.10.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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