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J Vis. 2017 Nov 1;17(13):10. doi: 10.1167/17.13.10.

Neural representation of form-contingent color filling-in in the early visual cortex.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology and Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA.
2
Psychology Department and Vanderbilt Vision Research Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.

Abstract

Perceptual filling-in exemplifies the constructive nature of visual processing. Color, a prominent surface property of visual objects, can appear to spread to neighboring areas that lack any color. We investigated cortical responses to a color filling-in illusion that effectively dissociates perceived color from the retinal input (van Lier, Vergeer, & Anstis, 2009). Observers adapted to a star-shaped stimulus with alternating red- and cyan-colored points to elicit a complementary afterimage. By presenting an achromatic outline that enclosed one of the two afterimage colors, perceptual filling-in of that color was induced in the unadapted central region. Visual cortical activity was monitored with fMRI, and analyzed using multivariate pattern analysis. Activity patterns in early visual areas (V1-V4) reliably distinguished between the two color-induced filled-in conditions, but only higher extrastriate visual areas showed the predicted correspondence with color perception. Activity patterns allowed for reliable generalization between filled-in colors and physical presentations of perceptually matched colors in areas V3 and V4, but not in earlier visual areas. These findings suggest that the perception of filled-in surface color likely requires more extensive processing by extrastriate visual areas, in order for the neural representation of surface color to become aligned with perceptually matched real colors.

PMID:
29136409
PMCID:
PMC6097584
DOI:
10.1167/17.13.10
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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