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Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2018 Feb;18(1):16-25. doi: 10.1097/ACI.0000000000000414.

Association between allergic and nonallergic rhinitis and obstructive sleep apnea.

Zheng M1,2, Wang X1,2, Zhang L1,2,3.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing TongRen Hospital, Capital Medical University.
2
Beijing Key Laboratory of Nasal diseases, Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology.
3
Department of Allergy, Beijing TongRen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Allergic rhinitis and nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) are common disorders, which have been considered as potential risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This review summarizes the proposed underlying pathophysiological mechanisms to provide a better understanding of the relationship between these conditions.

RECENT FINDINGS:

In adults, allergic rhinitis and NAR may be considered as symptoms potentiating, rather than risk potentiating factors in the pathophysiology of OSA, whereas in children, these are considered to be independent predictors for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and failure of adeno-tonsillectomy, the recommended first-line therapy for children with OSA. Current advances suggest IL-6 may be important in regulating the sleep-wake cycle, and serum soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) levels may reflect the severity of OSA. Elevated Th17/Treg ratio correlates positively with apnea-hypopnea index of OSA patients, and Th17 and Treg imbalances caused by allergic rhinitis and OSA, respectively, may possibly promote each other, leading to further imbalance. Moreover, obesity is a strong risk factor for OSA, and leptin plays an important role in ventilatory function and upper airway obstruction. The variant trigeminocardiac reflex and nasotrigeminal reflex may also be involved in the association between rhinitis and OSA.

SUMMARY:

Allergic rhinitis/NAR and OSA are closely associated, and each condition can be detrimental to the other. Thus, clinicians should pay attention to the potential presence of allergic rhinitis/NAR in OSA patients and vice versa.

PMID:
29135515
DOI:
10.1097/ACI.0000000000000414
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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